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Dilda you hooker lets salute

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Dilda you hooker lets salute

Post by Lula's Mom on Sat Sep 12, 2015 12:23 am

Come on Dilma Dilda let us salute the fucking mandioca you fucking bitch and I hate you!



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMFX84cZpPM
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Re: Dilda you hooker lets salute

Post by Your Mom on Sat Sep 12, 2015 3:24 pm

Mandioca, aka manioc and cassava, is a Brazilian staple that migrated across the Atlantic with the slave trade and became a staple in Africa as well. It is a starchy root and is used in various ways.

When it's ground and dried it is known as farinha de mandioca and is then used for farofa. My first experience with it was interesting. It is used as an accompaniment for churrasco - Brazilian BBQ and it's like eating sand. Most Brazilians have no idea why they eat it with churrasco, but they all do. It is a must have!


Farofa is a toasted cassava flour mixture,[1] though variants are made with manioc flour (farinha de mandioca), and flavors can vary. It is eaten in South America. It can be found commercially produced and packaged but is often prepared at home based on family recipes. Most recipes will also contain varying amounts of salt, smoked meat, and spices. The consistency of the mixture ranges from large grains the size of cracked bulgur wheat or couscous down to a table-salt-sized powder. Most farofas have a very smoky and slightly salty taste, by and large used to accentuate the taste of meat, particularly barbecued meat and hearty stews.

In Brazil, where farofa is particularly popular, typical recipes call for raw cassava flour to be toasted with butter, salt, sausage, olives, onions, garlic, hard boiled eggs and/or bacon until golden brown. It is an essential accompaniment to feijoada[1] and Brazilian barbecue. In Brazil, farofa is also used in a stuffing for poultry and other dishes, usually containing raisins, nuts and/or finely chopped sweet fruits like apples and bananas.

Farofa is served alongside the main course and can either be sprinkled on by individual diners to their taste before eating, or eaten as an accompaniment in its own right, as rice is often consumed.

In West Africa, a variant of cassava flour known as garri is used in various dishes.
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